The Long Version

Retired broadcast journalist. Blogging helps scratch the itch. Recovering exRepublican – Sober and still Conservative.

Posts Tagged ‘Christ

Anti-Bullying Campaign Co-Founder is a Bully

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What happens when the editorial director of an alternative news weekly out of Seattle, Washington speaks in front of more than 2000 high school students at a national high school journalism convention?

He turns into a high school student.

But it gets even more ridiculous.

Dan SavageDan Savage is also the co-founder of the anti-bullying It Gets Better Project, but as he falls into his teenage relapse he morphs directly into that class bully we all knew picking on those he doesn’t like.  In this case it happened to be Christians and their “Bible”.

Savage, who was invited to the convention to speak on bullying, and we would hope, denounce it and suggest ways for students to eliminate it, and overcome it, instead took the opportunity to go on a profanity-laced tirade against the Bible (via his interpretation of it’s teachings), and those who follow it.

“We can learn to ignore the bullsh– in the Bible about gay people,” Savage said, “the same way we have learned to ignore the bullsh– about shellfish, about slavery, about dinner, about farming, about menstruation, about virginity, about masturbation. We ignore bullsh– in the Bible about all sorts of things. The Bible is a radically pro-slavery document. Slave owners waved Bibles over their heads in the Civil War and justified it,” Savage preached.

And as one might expect from a crowd of immature 15 to 18 year-old adolescents with little concept of Biblical context or acumen, Savage received a shower of “Duuuude that dude just swore! Sweeeeeeet”, cheers and applause.

But not every student thought the assault on a book of scripture and the thinly veiled knock on those who believe it to be the word of God was appropriate, funny, or worth cheering and applauding.  Dozens of students and their advisers stood and walked out on the speaker.  To which Savage let loose this bullyfied gem, “You can tell the Bible guys in the hall, they can come back now because I’m done beating up the Bible.  It’s funny when someone is on the receiving end of “beatings” that are justified by the Bible, how “pansy-assed” some people react.”

Today Savage joined the long line of leftist elites in the apology parade as he “tried” to convince us that he wasn’t bullying the students and advisers who walked out on him.

“I wasn’t calling the handful of students who left pansies (2,800+ students, most of them Christian, stayed and listened), just the walkout itself,” he said.

“I was not attacking the faith in which I was raised,” he added. “I was attacking the argument that gay people must be discriminated against—and anti-bullying programs that address anti-gay bullying should be blocked (or exceptions should be made for bullying “motivated by faith”)—because it says right there in the Bible that being gay is wrong.”

Here again we have someone on the left defining the argument so as to justify his own bigoted bully pulpit tactics.  I don’t know of a single Bible believing, practicing Christian who thinks it’s OK to bully anyone, period.  That is not what Christ taught nor what the Bible teaches and Savage, the adult, knows it.

Savage, the teenager, however saw an opportunity to become part of the “cool” crowd and with the punch of a few well-timed expletives he succeeded.

His parents must be so proud!

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Written by DCL

April 30, 2012 at 8:00 pm

He Is Risen –

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The empty tomb that first Easter morning was the answer to Job’s question, “If a man die, shall he live again?”

More than 2,000 years ago, Christ, our Savior, was born to mortal life in a stable in Bethlehem. The long-foretold Messiah had come.

There was very little written of the boyhood of Jesus. I love the passage from Luke: “And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man.”  And from the book of Acts, there is a short phrase concerning the Savior which has a world of meaning: “[He] went about doing good.”

He was baptized by John in the river Jordan. He called the Twelve Apostles. He blessed the sick. He caused the lame to walk, the blind to see, the deaf to hear. He even raised the dead to life. He taught, He testified, and He provided a perfect example for us to follow.

And then the mortal mission of the Savior of the world drew to its close. A last supper with His Apostles took place in an upper room. Ahead lay Gethsemane and Calvary’s cross.

No mere mortal can conceive the full import of what Christ did for us in Gethsemane. He Himself later described the experience: “[The] suffering caused myself, even God, the greatest of all, to tremble because of pain, and to bleed at every pore, and to suffer both body and spirit.”

Following the agony of Gethsemane, now drained of strength, He was seized by rough, crude hands and taken before Annas, Caiaphas, Pilate, and Herod. He was accused and cursed. Vicious blows further weakened His pain-racked body. Blood ran down His face as a cruel crown fashioned of sharp thorns was forced onto His head, piercing His brow. And then once again He was taken to Pilate, who gave in to the cries of the angry mob: “Crucify him, crucify him.”

He was scourged with a whip into whose multiple leather strands sharp metals and bones were woven. Rising from the cruelty of the scourge, with stumbling steps He carried His own cross until He could go no farther and another shouldered the burden for Him.

Finally, on a hill called Calvary, while helpless followers looked on, His wounded body was nailed to a cross. Mercilessly He was mocked and cursed and derided. And yet He cried out, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.”

The agonizing hours passed as His life ebbed. From His parched lips came the words, “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost.”

As the serenity and solace of a merciful death freed Him from the sorrows of mortality, He returned to the presence of His Father.

At the last moment, the Master could have turned back. But He did not. He passed beneath all things that He might save all things. His lifeless body was hurriedly but gently placed in a borrowed tomb.

No words in Christendom mean more to me than those spoken by the angel to the weeping Mary Magdalene and the other Mary when, on the first day of the week, they approached the tomb to care for the body of their Lord. Spoke the angel:

“Why seek ye the living among the dead?

“He is not here, but is risen.”

Our Savior lived again. The most glorious, comforting, and reassuring of all events of human history had taken place—the victory over death. The pain and agony of Gethsemane and Calvary had been wiped away. The salvation of mankind had been secured. The Fall of Adam had been reclaimed.

“In our hour of deepest sorrow, we can receive profound peace from the words of the angel that first Easter morning: “He is not here: for he is risen.”

President Thomas S. Monson – President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints