The Long Version

Retired broadcast journalist. Blogging helps scratch the itch. Recovering exRepublican – Sober and still Conservative.

Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

Merry Christmas! A Story for all Seasons

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Gather the kids around the computer, turn up your speakers and prepare to feel warm and fuzzy.

You Are Special

Story by Max Lucado

Illustrations by Sergio Martinez

Narration by Doug Long

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Written by DCL

December 24, 2012 at 6:53 pm

The Spirit of Thanksgiving

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Think for a moment, if you will, of someone you know who is truly happy. We’ve all met those who seem to radiate happiness. They seem to smile more than others; they laugh more than others—just being around them makes us happier as well.

Let me suggest it is because they have an attitude of gratitude.

Now think of the person you first thought of again and grade on this principle: Does he or she live in thanksgiving daily? Those who live in thanksgiving daily are usually among the world’s happiest people. And they make others happy as well. Living in thanksgiving daily is a habit that will enrich our lives and the lives of those we love.

Gratitude is a mark of a noble soul and a refined character. We like to be around those who are grateful. They tend to brighten all around them. They make others feel better about themselves. They tend to be more humble, more joyful, more likable.

Gratitude turns a meal into a feast and drudgery into delight. It softens our grief and heightens our pleasure. It turns the simple and common into the memorable and transcendent. It forges bonds of love and fosters loyalty and admiration.

Consider what you are grateful for. Count your blessings, if you will, and see if it doesn’t warm your heart and bring a smile to your face.

May we all strive to have an attitude of gratitude every day and let this Thanksgiving Day start us down that path.

Have a wonderful, safe, and happy Thanksgiving!

 

Written by DCL

November 21, 2012 at 2:21 pm

He Is Risen –

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The empty tomb that first Easter morning was the answer to Job’s question, “If a man die, shall he live again?”

More than 2,000 years ago, Christ, our Savior, was born to mortal life in a stable in Bethlehem. The long-foretold Messiah had come.

There was very little written of the boyhood of Jesus. I love the passage from Luke: “And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man.”  And from the book of Acts, there is a short phrase concerning the Savior which has a world of meaning: “[He] went about doing good.”

He was baptized by John in the river Jordan. He called the Twelve Apostles. He blessed the sick. He caused the lame to walk, the blind to see, the deaf to hear. He even raised the dead to life. He taught, He testified, and He provided a perfect example for us to follow.

And then the mortal mission of the Savior of the world drew to its close. A last supper with His Apostles took place in an upper room. Ahead lay Gethsemane and Calvary’s cross.

No mere mortal can conceive the full import of what Christ did for us in Gethsemane. He Himself later described the experience: “[The] suffering caused myself, even God, the greatest of all, to tremble because of pain, and to bleed at every pore, and to suffer both body and spirit.”

Following the agony of Gethsemane, now drained of strength, He was seized by rough, crude hands and taken before Annas, Caiaphas, Pilate, and Herod. He was accused and cursed. Vicious blows further weakened His pain-racked body. Blood ran down His face as a cruel crown fashioned of sharp thorns was forced onto His head, piercing His brow. And then once again He was taken to Pilate, who gave in to the cries of the angry mob: “Crucify him, crucify him.”

He was scourged with a whip into whose multiple leather strands sharp metals and bones were woven. Rising from the cruelty of the scourge, with stumbling steps He carried His own cross until He could go no farther and another shouldered the burden for Him.

Finally, on a hill called Calvary, while helpless followers looked on, His wounded body was nailed to a cross. Mercilessly He was mocked and cursed and derided. And yet He cried out, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.”

The agonizing hours passed as His life ebbed. From His parched lips came the words, “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost.”

As the serenity and solace of a merciful death freed Him from the sorrows of mortality, He returned to the presence of His Father.

At the last moment, the Master could have turned back. But He did not. He passed beneath all things that He might save all things. His lifeless body was hurriedly but gently placed in a borrowed tomb.

No words in Christendom mean more to me than those spoken by the angel to the weeping Mary Magdalene and the other Mary when, on the first day of the week, they approached the tomb to care for the body of their Lord. Spoke the angel:

“Why seek ye the living among the dead?

“He is not here, but is risen.”

Our Savior lived again. The most glorious, comforting, and reassuring of all events of human history had taken place—the victory over death. The pain and agony of Gethsemane and Calvary had been wiped away. The salvation of mankind had been secured. The Fall of Adam had been reclaimed.

“In our hour of deepest sorrow, we can receive profound peace from the words of the angel that first Easter morning: “He is not here: for he is risen.”

President Thomas S. Monson – President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Do As I Say, Not As I Do

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A North Carolina State Senator was recently in the news after he shot one of two intruders at his home near Tabor City, NC.  The intruder wasn’t killed and his injuries were reported to be non-life-threatening.  75 year-old RC Soles, Democrat in the North Carolina Senate, ultimately plead guilty to a misdemeanor assault charge, was fined $1,000 and sent home bringing cries of injustice from many in North Carolina.  Whether his sentence was light or not isn’t the point.  If he was acting in self defense I stand by his right to act as he did.  But that’s not why this story made it into my blog nor is it what incited the headline.

You see, Senator Soles has a long history and has made his career in politics rallying against gun ownership for the general public.  Interesting, how politicians like Soles are so eager to take away your right to defend yourself in your home with a gun yet don’t hesitate to do it themselves when faced by an intruder.

In typical hypocritical fashion, and some would say “Liberal fashion”, the “Do as I say and not as I do” Anti-Gun Activist Lawmaker picked up his gun and fired at his would-be assailant. Why hypocritical you may ask?  One look at his long legislative record shows that the actions he took to protect his family, property, and life, are actions he feels ordinary citizens should not be allowed to take if they are faced with an identical situation.

It  prompts us to ask if the Senator believes his life, family, and personal safety is more valuable than yours or mine.  But, it’s what we’ve all come to expect from those who believe they can run our lives, raise our kids, and protect our families better than we can.

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Just for fun here’s a little 2nd amendment “Tedbit O Fun” from our good friend Ted “Snakeskin Cowboy” Nugent as he schools CNN’s Piers Morgan on gun control. Gotta love Ted!

CLICK HERE to see Ted in action.